In few weeks time, Emmanuel Macron who just won the presidency of France at age 39 will take office.

Our team of researchers sees Mr. Macron, 39 as a beacon of hope to the young generation across the world and then thought it wise to present you with the profile of the man who will take charge of one the strongest economies in Europe when the current president Francois Hollande vacates office

PROFILE OF EMMANUEL MACRON

Emmanuel Jean-Michel Frédéric Macron born 21 December 1977) is a French politician, senior civil servant, and former investment banker. Born in Amiens, he studied Philosophy at Paris Nanterre University, completed a Master’s of Public Affairs at Sciences Po, and graduated from the École nationale d’administration (ENA) in 2004. He worked as an Inspector of Finances in the Inspectorate General of Finances (IGF) and then became an investment banker at Rothschild & Cie Banque.

A member of the Socialist Party (PS) from 2006 to 2009, Macron was appointed as deputy secretary-general under François Hollande’s first government in 2012. He was appointed Minister of Economy, Industry and Digital Affairs in 2014 under the Second Valls Government, where he pushed through business-friendly reforms. He resigned in August 2016 to launch a bid in the 2017 presidential election. In November 2016, Macron declared that he would run in the election under the banner of En Marche!, a centrist political movement he founded in April 2016. He qualified for the runoff after the first round of the election on 23 April 2017.

Early life and education

Born in Amiens, Emmanuel Jean-Michel Frédéric Macron is the son of Françoise (Noguès), a physician, and Jean-Michel Macron, Professor of neurology at the University of Picardy.Raised in a non-religious family, he was baptized a Roman Catholic at his own request at age 12.

He was educated mostly at the Jésuites de la Providence lycée in Amiens before his parents sent him to finish his last year of school at the élite high school Lycée Henri-IV in Paris. He studied Philosophy at the University of Paris-Ouest Nanterre La Défense, obtaining a DEA degree.

He obtained a master’s degree in public affairs at Sciences Po, before training for a senior civil service career at the École nationale d’administration (ENA), graduating in 2004.

Professional career

Macron worked as an Inspector of Finances in the French Ministry of Economy between 2004 and 2008. In 2007, he served as deputy rapporteur for the Commission to improve French economic growth headed by Jacques Attali. Macron paid €50,000 to buy himself out of his government contract in 2008, and left to work as an investment banker at a highly-paid position at Rothschild & Cie Banque.

Political career

Macron was a member of the Socialist Party (PS) from 2006 to 2009.

From 2012 to 2014, he served as deputy secretary-general of the Élysée, a senior role in President Hollande’s staff.He was appointed as the Minister of Economy and Finance in the second Valls Cabinet on 26 August 2014, replacing Arnaud Montebourg.As Minister of the Economy, Macron was at the forefront of pushing through business-friendly reforms. On 17 February 2015, prime minister Manuel Valls pushed Macron’s signature law package through a reluctant parliament using the special 49.3 procedure.

In August 2015, Macron stated that he was no longer a member of the PS and was now an Independent.

2017 French presidential bid

Macron founded En Marche! in Amiens on 6 April 2016.A liberal, progressive political movement, En Marche!, an independent political party, for which he was reprimanded by President Hollande. On 30 August 2016, Macron resigned from the government ahead of the 2017 presidential election. On 16 November 2016, Macron formally declared his candidacy for the French presidency after months of speculation. In his announcement speech, Macron called for a “democratic revolution” and promised to “unblock France”.

Macron attracted criticism for the time taken to spell out a formal program during his campaign; despite declaring in November, he had still not released a complete set of proposals by February, attracting both attacks from critics and concern among allies and supporters.He eventually laid out his 150-page formal program on 2 March, publishing it online and discussing it at a marathon press conference that day.

Macron accumulated a wide array of supporters, securing endorsements from François Bayrou of the Democratic Movement (MoDem), MEP Daniel Cohn-Bendit, the ecologist candidate François de Rugy of the primary of the left, and Socialist MP Richard Ferrand, secretary-general of En Marche!, as well as numerous others – many of them from the Socialist Party, but also a significant number of centrist and centre-right politicians.

Political positions

Macron has been described by some observers as a social liberal and by others as a social democrat. During his time in the French Socialist Party, he supported the party’s right wing,whose political stance has been associated with “third way” policies advanced by Bill Clinton, Tony Blair and Gerhard Schröder, and whose leading spokesman has been former prime minister Manuel Valls.

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